Campsites in Cornwall

Cornwall forms the tip of the South-West peninsula of mainland Britain, bordered only by the county of Devon. Stretching over almost 300 miles of continuous and wildly diverse coastline in Britain, there is so much to see, do and explore when camping in Cornwall. Read more.

Tregurrian

Tregurrian Club Site

A perfect hillside campsite for water sport and beach lovers alike on the north coast of Cornwall, with plenty of opportunity to be as active or restful as you wish on the miles of golden sandy beaches in this part of the region. This is a great base for exploring places of interest around the whole county. Local attractions include the Extreme Academy where you can try out watersports such as surfing and kite-surfing, the Lappa Valley Steam Railway, Newquay Zoo, the Bluereef Aquariam and Crealy Adventure Park.

Top site for watersports
Top site for photography
Top site for beaches
Top site for watersports
Top site for photography
Top site for beaches

Sennen Cove

sennen-cove

A quiet, yet dramatically scenic site close to the famous Land’s End where there is plenty on offer within easy reach for all the family. From spectacular cliff-top walks, to surfing at Sennen beach with its miles of golden sand, there are just a few miles between the north and south Cornish coasts at this most westerly club site. A bus service to the coastal town of St Ives stops right outside the campsite, with the local attractions of Trevarno Gardens, Levant Beam Engine and Mine and St Michael’s Mount nearby.

Top site for cycling
Top site for beaches
Top site for cycling
Top site for beaches

Bude

bude

This campsite is situated near Bude in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty; perfectly situated for glorious Cornish beaches, surfing, sandcastles, walking, exploring the legends of King Arthur, and all that wonderful Cornwall has to offer. From this beautiful campsite you can join the South West Coast Path, the longest National Trail in Britain spanning an incredible 630 miles of coastal walking. If cycling is more your thing, the Camel Trail cycle route follows a disused railway line from Padstow to Bodmin Moor.

Top site for beaches
Top site for beaches

Veryan

veryan

Boasting gorgeous, tree-framed views, this wonderfully relaxing campsite is situated on the Roseland Peninsula in south Cornwall. This superb site has a field for ball games, a fully stocked and picturesque fishing lake, plus a spacious lodge for hire. The site is perfect for keen cyclists, who can join the National Cycle Network (Route 3) at the site entrance. Close to the site is Pendower Beach, whose cliffs and rock pools have been designated as Sites of Specific Scientific Interest, while local attractions include the Eden Project.

Top site for photography
Top site for fishing
Top site for cycling
Top site for beaches
Top site for photography
Top site for fishing
Top site for cycling
Top site for beaches

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Things to do: Camping in Cornwall

There are plenty of places to go camping in Cornwall, and by choosing a camping holiday in this beautiful part of the world you will discover turquoise seas, stunning beaches and spectacular cliffs.


Explore the Cornish coastline

Explore picturesque fishing villages, smugglers’ coves and ancient stone circles along this dramatic stretch of coastline.

The north coast, on the Celtic Sea, is exposed to prevailing winds that blow in from the Atlantic Ocean. It is much wilder in nature with sheer cliffs that plunge hundreds of feet into the sea below. Cornwall is home to miles of clean, golden beaches with azure bays welcoming gigantic Atlantic rollers; a magnet for surfers and families alike.

Campsites in Cornwall, on the north coast, include Sennen Cove, Tregurrian and Bude. A few miles off shore from Cornwall’s most westerly point, Land’s End, lies an archipelago of tiny islands which form the Isles of Scilly.

Tracing the most southerly tip of mainland Britain, the Lizard Coastal Walk is a fantastic day-out for the whole family. Boasting dramatic cliffs, rare geology and bustling wildlife, this three-hour trek is very popular with tourists. Starting and ending at Kynance Cove, this route follows the South West Coastal Path and passes typical Cornish landscapes.

The south coast, dubbed the ‘Cornish Riviera’, is more sheltered with several broad estuaries including Falmouth and Fowey. Beaches here usually have coarser sand and shingle, and the climate is generally milder. Choose to camp in this area at picturesque Veryan.


Uncover Cornish culture

The interior of Cornwall is home to glorious countryside and wild moorland. Today, Cornwall’s economy is based on tourism, yet up until the early 20th century it was the most important mining area in the whole of Europe.

It is thought that tin was mined here as early as the Bronze Age, with copper, lead, zinc and silver all being mined too. Recently awarded World Heritage Site status, the landscape is generously sprinkled with remnants of its mining past - demonstrating the county’s enormous contribution to the Industrial Revolution.

Due to its secluded location, independent identity and fascinating traditions, Cornwall is arguably Britain’s most unique county. With ancient connections to King Arthur and tales of giants, pixies, and mermaids, mystical folklore is a prominent part of Cornish culture.

Widely thought to King Arthur’s elusive Camelot, Tintagel Castle is a medieval fortress perched on the edge of a sea cliff. Surrounded by bent, stunted trees and eerie mining trees, Bodmin Moor is home to the Beast of Bodmin and Dozmary Pool - a lake associated with King Arthur’s legendary sword Excalibur.

With an abundance of locally caught seafood and delicious local delicacies, Cornwall is famed for its food and drink culture. Arguably the county’s most iconic dish, the Cornish Pasty is an essential part of any camping trip in Cornwall. Take a trip to Padstow to sample food by revered celebrity chef, Rick Stein.

Other Cornish Attractions

Cornwall is famous for many things; from surfing, beautiful gardens, boat trips and scuba diving, to coastal walks and moorland walking trails. Here are five things to do on your next camping trip in Cornwall:

1. Eden Project

Explore the world’s largest indoor rainforest, 20 acres of gardens and over 3,000 varieties of plant life at the Eden Project. Situated between the charming towns of St Austell and Fowey, the Eden Project conducts valuable research into plant conservation and host hands-on learning experiences about climate change, ecosystems and plant resources.

2. Minack Theatre

At first glance, the Minack Theatre might look like a ruined Mediterranean temple, however it is actually an outdoor auditorium for theatrical productions. Located right on the tip of the south-west peninsula, a short drive from Land’s End, the Minack Theatre is a dramatic landscape overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

3. The Lost Gardens of Heligan

Awarded Garden of the Year in 2013, the Lost Gardens of Heligan offer 200 acres of exotic gardens to explore. Twenty-five years ago, Heligan’s historic gardens were unknown and lost under a tangle of weeds. Today, the Lost Gardens have been restored to their former glory among the finest gardens in Cornwall.

4. Land’s End

Famous for being England’s most westerly point and a popular tourist attraction, Land’s End is home to rugged cliffs, glistening waves and meandering pathways. This iconic Cornish landscape is the perfect photographic opportunity.

5. St Michael’s Mount

Depending on the time of day and stage of tide, you can either wander across the causeway or hop in a boat to get to St Michael’s Mount. Positioned upon a small island just off the coastal town of Marazion, St Michael’s Mount is home to castle walls, ancient cobbles and sub-tropical gardens.


Looking for more destinations in the South West? Take a look at our Club Sites in Cornwall’s neighbouring counties, Devon and Dorset.