Camping in National Parks

Camping in National Parks

Great Britain boasts 15 National Parks, each with its own unique qualities and landscape, but all equal in beauty and diversity. Not only do these vast and protected places offer a tranquil escape from today’s fast-paced living, they also provide a place to seek excitement and adventure.

There’s something for everyone to enjoy in these great open spaces from discovering the flora and fauna and wildlife watching, to getting to know the communities and those who live in them. These rich and varied landscapes also provide the perfect setting to get active, whether it be a gentle woodland walk with the children, climbing up spectacular mountains, cycling along a woodland track or canoeing on one of the park’s many waterways.

If these aren’t reasons enough to visit a National Park, here’s 29 more. That’s the number of campsites the Club has located within or on the edge of a National Park – all providing the perfect pitch from which to explore these magical places.

Brecon Beacons

Brecon Beacons National Park

The Brecon Beacons National Park covers some 552 square miles of high, grassy ridges and includes the highest mountains in southern Britain.

Brecon Beacons

Cairngorms

Cairngorms National Park

Aviemore, the Angus Glens, Atholl and Glenshee and the Royal Deeside and Donside area, famous for its royal connections and Balmoral Castle, fall within this National Park.

Cairngorms

Dartmoor

Dartmoor National Park

This Park's landscape has inspired poets, artists, photographers and authors - and featured on the silver and small screen with TVs Hound of the Baskervilles and in cinemas in Steven Spielberg's War Horse.

Dartmoor

Exmoor

Exmoor National Park

This area contains some of Britain’s oldest agricultural land and ancient herds of horned sheep, Exmoor ponies and wild red deer roam its fields and bridleways.

Exmoor

Lake District

Lake District National Park

England’s highest mountain peaks, Scafell Pike, Helvellyn and Skiddaw, fall within this beautiful National Park.

Lake District

Loch Lomond and the Trossachs

Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park

Some 720 square miles of mountains, moorlands, iconic summits, two forest parks and water – lots of it, all at Scotland’s heart

Loch Lomond and the Trossachs

New Forest

New Forest National Park

This Park’s landscape is unique, and includes woodland, open heathland, river and coastal habitats and much of which is important for nature conservation.

New Forest

North York Moors

North York Moors National Park

North York Moors is the smallest of Yorkshire's three National Parks but home to the largest expanse of unbroken wild heather moorland in England.

North York Moors

Northumberland

Northumberland National Park

Its remote location, beautiful and diverse landscape and rich heritage draws thousands of visitors every year to explore this northern Park.

Northumberland

Peak District

Peak District National Park

The UK’s first national park offers a mix of rugged plateaux and heather moorland to pretty villages and peaceful dales.

Peak District

Pembrokeshire Coast

Pembrokeshire Coast National Park

This is Britain’s only coastal national park. It covers around 230 square miles incorporating around 180 miles of the west Wales coastline

Pembrokeshire Coast

Snowdonia

Snowdonia National Park

As well as its impressive mountains, Snowdonia boasts a range of other natural features – rivers, lakes, waterfalls, moorlands, forests, glacial valleys and a stunning coastline.

Snowdonia

South Downs

South Downs National Park

Britain's newest National Park stretches from the outskirts of Winchester in the west to the cliffs of Beachy Head near Eastbourne in the east.

South Downs

Useful Information

Useful information for walking and trecking around UK's National Parks

Useful Information

Yorkshire Dales

Yorkshire Dales National Park

The area is a walkers’ paradise with the Dales Way, the Ribble Way and the Pennine Way all passing through the Park.

Yorkshire Dales

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